Reef Central Online Community

Home Forum Here you can view your subscribed threads, work with private messages and edit your profile and preferences View New Posts View Today's Posts

Find other members Frequently Asked Questions Search Reefkeeping ...an online magazine for marine aquarists Support our sponsors and mention Reef Central

Go Back   Reef Central Online Community Archives > General Interest Forums > Advanced Topics

 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09/16/2004, 02:05 PM
reefsociety101 reefsociety101 is offline
Premium Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Orange County
Posts: 282
Cooking Live Rock - Exact Process?

Hi,

I've been reading alot about this process of "cooking" live rock. What does this process actually entail? Are we actually heating up the live rock in an oven? How would one go about cooking the live rock? What is the benefits and should it be done to existing mature rock or newly cured/uncured rock. I apologize for the new question but even after using the search option I was unable to figure out exactly what this is.

Thanks!

Michael
  #2  
Old 09/16/2004, 02:16 PM
pi pi is offline
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Sunny South (Columbia,SC)
Posts: 1,702
I have no first hand knowledge, but have read severl references to the technique.

The idea is to clean your older liverock by placing in new clean ASW. Every 7 days or so you give the rock a good shake and take it out and place it in a new container of ASW. You repeat this for 6 to 8 weeks.

The idea is you give the bateria in the rock nothing to feed upon except the "stuff" in the rock (organics) and over time clean it out.

It was either boomer or bomber ( get them mixed up) who I saw make the first reference to "cooking" the rock and you can search on their name for more info. You can also try seant who I believe used this technique successfully. I am thinking of trying it myself, using a few rocks at a time to "revamp" my older rock.
  #3  
Old 09/16/2004, 02:23 PM
reefsociety101 reefsociety101 is offline
Premium Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Orange County
Posts: 282
Pi,

Thank You! So should this process be performed on nearly acquired live rock? Isn't this process a mirror of the same curing process we use for newly acquired live rock? I'm starting a new tank and was wondering if I should perform this process on new rock.

Also during this process should I be skimming heavily?

Michael
  #4  
Old 09/16/2004, 02:28 PM
MiddletonMark MiddletonMark is offline
troublemaker
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 13,532
Here's one thread about it:
http://archive.reefcentral.com/forum...t=cooking+rock
__________________
read a lot, think for yourself
  #5  
Old 09/16/2004, 02:31 PM
pi pi is offline
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Sunny South (Columbia,SC)
Posts: 1,702
I do not see any benefit to using this technique on new rock. The idea is for cleaning older rock that may have become saturated. Think of it as recharging the rock.

Though it has some similarities to curing new rock I would not say the two are exact. Curing has more to do with amonia/nitrate/nitrite cycle as well as dead dying life that came in with the rock.
  #6  
Old 09/16/2004, 02:36 PM
reefsociety101 reefsociety101 is offline
Premium Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Orange County
Posts: 282
Thanks guys, always something new to learn. *Smile.
  #7  
Old 09/16/2004, 02:44 PM
MiddletonMark MiddletonMark is offline
troublemaker
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 13,532
I'd agree with Pi too - but figured an informative link is good too.

I've only used this on `old' rock personally - which makes it seem `new' yet without the coralline. I'm not sure if you need to make new rock more `new' seeming
__________________
read a lot, think for yourself
  #8  
Old 09/16/2004, 03:33 PM
Ssaah Ssaah is offline
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Saratoga, CA
Posts: 294
I prefer using a pre-heated oven at 375 degrees.

Lightly salt and pepper the rock and place it on a cookie sheet in the oven. Bake for 1 hour.

For extra flavor a lemon-saltwater glaze can be used to baste it every 15 minutes.

Tastes just like mom used to make!
  #9  
Old 09/16/2004, 03:47 PM
pi pi is offline
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Sunny South (Columbia,SC)
Posts: 1,702
...mmmm I can smell it now. Just like being a kid again!
  #10  
Old 09/17/2004, 09:15 AM
mps9506 mps9506 is offline
Registered Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Wilmington, NC
Posts: 489
I cooked my rock from October of last year until Febuary in prepreation for a move and new tank setup.
Works very well, I got rid of a ton of crud out of my rock, the detrius buildup in my new barebottom setup is very low.

I personally will do the same thing to any new rock I buy, even if it means I don't get the associated life on my rock.
Mike
  #11  
Old 09/17/2004, 08:29 PM
SeanT SeanT is offline
Refurbished Reefer.
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Nort Carolina
Posts: 10,945
Quote:
Originally posted by SeanT
Dave,
Sure thing.
But before I do I just want to say that Bomber instructed me how to do it several months ago and it works great. So it is his process that I am trying to make popular and cause fellow hobbyists a lot less heartache in the long term.
The purpose of "cooking" your rocks is to have tha bacteria consume all (or as much) organic material and PO4 stored on, and in, the rock as possible.

The first step to this is commitment.
You have to be willing to remove your rock from the tank.
It doesn't have to be all at once, but I feel if you are going to do this do it all. In stages if that is easier but make sure that all of it gets done.

The new environment you are creating for your rock is to take it from an algal driven to a bacterial driven system.
In order to this, the rock needs to be in total darkness to retard and eventually kill the algae's on the rock and to give the bacteria time to do the job.

So basically you need tubs to hold the rock.

Equipment needed.
1. Dedication.
2. Tubs to cook rock in. And an equal amount of tubs to hold the rock during waterchanges.
3. A few powerheads.
4. Plenty of buckets.
5. A smug feeling of superiority that you are taking it to "the next level."

Here are the steps, if you have any questions I will try my best to answer them. What I don't know I am sure Bomber can/will instruct.

1. Get into your head and accept the fact you will be making lots of salt water if you aren't lucky enough to have access to filtered NSW.
2. Explain to significant other what is going on so they don't flip out. This process can take up to 2 months. Prepare them in advance so he/she can mark it on the calendar and that they won't nag about it until that date arrives.
3. Setup a tub(s) where the rock is to be cooked. Garages are great for this.
4. Make up enough water to fill tub(s) about halfway and around 5-7 buckets about 60% full.
5. Remove all the rock you want to cook at this stage. (The rock can be removed piece by piece until you are done.) I suggest shutting off the circulation beforehand to minimize dust storms.
6. Take the first piece of rock and dunk it, swish it, very, very well in the first bucket. Then do it again in the 2nd bucket, then the third.
7. Place rock in the tub.
8. Repeat steps 6 & 7 to every piece of rock you want to cook at this time. The reason I suggested 5-7 buckets of water will be evident quickly...as the water quickly turnsq brown.
9. Place powerhead(s) in the tub and plug in. Position at least one powerhead so that it agitates the surface of the water pretty well. This is to keep the water oxygenated. You can use an air pump for additional oxygenation if you wish.
9. Cover the tub. Remember, we want total darkness.
10. Empty out buckets, restart circulation on main tank.
11. Wait.
12. During the first couple of weeks it is recommended to do a swishing and dunking of the rocks twice a week.
What this entails is to make up enough water to fill up those buckets and the tub the rock is in.
First, lay out your empty tub(s) and fill buckets the same as before.
Then, uncover tub with the rock in it. Take a rock and swish it in the tub it's in to knock any easy to get off junk.
Then, swish it thru the 3 buckets again, and place in the empty tub..
Repeat for all your rocks.
Then empty the tub that all the rocks were cooking in, take it outside and rinse it out with a hose.
Place tub back where it was, fill with new saltwater, add rocks and powerheads, and cover.
Wait again unti the next water change.
You will be utterly amazed at how much sand, silt, detrius is at the bottom of the tub and every bucket. It is amazing.

How it works:


Some FAQ's.
When re-introducing the rock to my tank, a month or two from now, should I do that in parts to help minimize any cycling effect(s)...if there are any?
I never have. Really after a very short while, the ammonium cycle has been extablished. That's not what you're worry about though, it's the stored phosphates and that you have to wait it out.
When they are producing very little detritus - you'll know - then I would use them all at once.

Would running Carbon filtration and/or a PO4 reducing media help/hurry/hinder the process?
I wouldn't fool with it. You don't want the detritus to sit there long enough to rot, release water soluble P again. You want to take it out while it's still locked up in that bacterial detritus.




I hope this helps you out.
It really is a "miracle" and a low cost one at that.
The only monies spent are for salt and electricity for the powerheads which are nominal. Especially to rid yourself of Bryopsis.
Time and effort is all it akes. And really not that much effort.
I would say that 85% of my exposed rock had Bryopsis (hair algae) covering it.
There isn't a single visible strand on andy rocks in the tubs now.
Remember, the key is patience. Let this process run its course.

And a few last minute tidbits I remembered.
Your coralline will die back, receed etc.
My thoughts on this are GREAT!
Now my rock is more porous for additional pods, mysids, worms etc.
Coralline will grow back.
Throughout this process the sponges, and pods on my rock have not died off.
Everytime I do a waterchange they are there and plentiful.

If you have any questions please ask.
__________________
My tank is cool. It has light bulbs a big bubble maker thingy and little boxes that blow water. It is way cool.
  #12  
Old 09/18/2004, 12:16 AM
bluemonster bluemonster is offline
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: South East Florida
Posts: 288
I bet crack-heads would love this thread!
  #13  
Old 09/19/2004, 01:39 AM
reefsociety101 reefsociety101 is offline
Premium Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Orange County
Posts: 282
SeanT

Thanks for the post, I guess I will be doing this process for all the new rock I will be getting as even new rock has all kinds of crap in it. Thanks!
  #14  
Old 09/21/2004, 07:50 PM
gregb gregb is offline
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Melbourne Australia
Posts: 196
I am a chef & I think your got rocks in your head. The only good thing out of it all would be a slight calcium rise, not worth the effort. A letter from Australia.
__________________
6x2x2
  #15  
Old 09/21/2004, 08:22 PM
pi pi is offline
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Sunny South (Columbia,SC)
Posts: 1,702
What? I think you need to read the entire thread!
  #16  
Old 09/21/2004, 08:29 PM
SeanT SeanT is offline
Refurbished Reefer.
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Nort Carolina
Posts: 10,945
Quote:
Originally posted by gregb
I am a chef & I think your got rocks in your head. The only good thing out of it all would be a slight calcium rise, not worth the effort. A letter from Australia.
What are you on about?
__________________
My tank is cool. It has light bulbs a big bubble maker thingy and little boxes that blow water. It is way cool.
  #17  
Old 09/25/2004, 02:27 PM
Bene' Bene' is offline
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Iowa
Posts: 226
I dunno what he is on about... I know it works so I guess he can say what he likes.
I used to do the same basic thing using sunlight and small scissors to trim the massive algae growths until I read Bomer say this was better somewhere. He was right, this way is just as effective if not a bit more so. A little slower likely, takes more water, but sure is less work overall, and the end result is a cleaner rock.
__________________
Benjamin
  #18  
Old 09/25/2004, 04:38 PM
SeanT SeanT is offline
Refurbished Reefer.
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Nort Carolina
Posts: 10,945
Bene I think you misread.
__________________
My tank is cool. It has light bulbs a big bubble maker thingy and little boxes that blow water. It is way cool.
  #19  
Old 09/25/2004, 06:19 PM
Bene' Bene' is offline
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Iowa
Posts: 226
Me misread? Wouldn't be the first time. I did actually read the whole thread though. Would you mind explaining? Thanks
__________________
Benjamin
  #20  
Old 09/25/2004, 09:57 PM
SeanT SeanT is offline
Refurbished Reefer.
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Nort Carolina
Posts: 10,945
From your post it seem like you are agreeing with gregb that the cooking style I posted wouldn't work/is not needed versus just drying them out in the sun.
__________________
My tank is cool. It has light bulbs a big bubble maker thingy and little boxes that blow water. It is way cool.
  #21  
Old 09/25/2004, 10:59 PM
Bene' Bene' is offline
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Iowa
Posts: 226
Sorry for not being clearer. What I meant was that I thought his comment was way off base. I know the "cooking" works as I have done it myself.
I went on to mention a similar process I have used. Which is cause massive dense algae growth via sunlight while the bacteria does its action sheltered from the light under the algae then trim the algae and repeat until the rock is clean and the algae stops growing.
When I do that to rocks they are in tanks not allowed to dry out in the sun. I think Bombers way is more complete though as its end result leaves all the algae dead not just really starved and partially dead.
__________________
Benjamin
  #22  
Old 09/29/2004, 02:51 PM
BlindRI BlindRI is offline
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: California
Posts: 74
I don't understand why you wouldn't benifit from "cooking" newly purchased live rock.

Aren't all rocks a few million years old and getting the crude out and opening up the pores (so to speak) would really help.

And isn't the same as quarantining an unknown new substance that could harm your system?
  #23  
Old 09/29/2004, 06:46 PM
SeanT SeanT is offline
Refurbished Reefer.
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Nort Carolina
Posts: 10,945
I would do it to most of the "new" LR for the following reason:
Just cuz I can.

Seriously, I would do it because of all the die-off in the packaging, handling, shipping plus to get out whatever was already in there.

When I eventually upgrade to a larger tank, I plan on setting that tank up first.
Transporting almost all of my current LR into it (no corals or fish).
Order live rock from several different areas (Fiji, Marshall, Tonga etc.)

Take a piece or two from each to place in the tank.
I doubt it will cause a cycle.
I will do that to hopefully trasport some varieties of life.

I will cure/cook the rest.
Place it in the tank when thru.

Remember, just because you are paranoid doesn't mean someone isn't out to get you.
__________________
My tank is cool. It has light bulbs a big bubble maker thingy and little boxes that blow water. It is way cool.
  #24  
Old 10/08/2004, 12:41 PM
CAreefer CAreefer is offline
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Paso Robles CA
Posts: 894
One question about "cooking" live rock. I would need to buy a couple of the rubbermaid stock tubs to rotate the rock through. Would a piece of plywood over the top be sufficient to block light? would that hinder or not allow for gas exchange? I can put a powerhead at the surface and run the airline from the venturi outside of the stock tub. Also, Having to make that much ASW would cost me a fortune in DI resin. The water leaving my RO membrane is between 10-12 ppm TDS. Would using this water to mix the ASW lengthen the cooking process?

Thanks for any help.
CAReefer
__________________
June 2005 TOTM
  #25  
Old 10/08/2004, 01:18 PM
SeanT SeanT is offline
Refurbished Reefer.
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Nort Carolina
Posts: 10,945
Plywood would work fine.
That is what I use.
The fit, due to the warping of plywood, isn't perfectly flat so plenty of air would get in there.
Just make sure your powerhead agitates the surface of the water.
The powerhead is for aeration and not flow. No need for airliline tubing imo.

The water from ypur RO should be fine.

Just be vigilant on your water changes and swishing the first couple of weeks and then about 3 times every two weeks after that.

Swish, swish, swish.
__________________
My tank is cool. It has light bulbs a big bubble maker thingy and little boxes that blow water. It is way cool.
 

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:13 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Use of this web site is subject to the terms and conditions described in the user agreement.
Reef Central Reef Central, LLC. Copyright 1999-2009