Reef Central Online Community

Home Forum Here you can view your subscribed threads, work with private messages and edit your profile and preferences View New Posts View Today's Posts

Find other members Frequently Asked Questions Search Reefkeeping ...an online magazine for marine aquarists Support our sponsors and mention Reef Central

Go Back   Reef Central Online Community Archives > General Interest Forums > Advanced Topics

 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10/20/2005, 12:38 PM
BrianPlankis BrianPlankis is offline
Invertebrate Advocate
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 1,915
ID...is this a polyclad flatworm?

Dr Ron,

Hello there. I saw this guy (or its brother/sister) six months ago in my tank and my pictures were too fuzzy for you. I managed to capture it last night, is this a polyclad flatworm?









I didn't find much information on them online, I found this:

http://www.reefkeeping.com/issues/2003-08/rs/index.php

http://www.rzuser.uni-heidelberg.de/~bu6/flatintr.htm

It seems their diet can range from algae to clams. Any way of telling what this one eats?

Also, I had to do a flatworm exit treatment on my main tank a couple of weeks ago, it killed off all the small red flatworms, why didn't it take this guy out?

Thanks!

Brian
__________________
Currently redesigning my 90 gallon tank system to support coral and invertebrate breeding. Click on my red house to see the thread with the progress.
  #2  
Old 10/20/2005, 02:51 PM
Sugar Magnolia Sugar Magnolia is offline
cubed
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 3,033
It sure looks like a polyclad flatworm to me.
__________________
just give me what I want and no one gets hurt
  #3  
Old 10/20/2005, 06:01 PM
greenbean36191 greenbean36191 is offline
Soul of a Sailor
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Huntsville/ Auburn, AL
Posts: 7,859
Send a message via AIM to greenbean36191
Yes. Worms with this pattern are pretty common in reef tanks and they seem to eat snails. The FWE didn't kill this guy because he's only very distantly related to the little red flatworms.
__________________
Lanikai, kahakai nani, aloha no au ia 'oe. A hui hou kakou.
  #4  
Old 10/21/2005, 08:57 AM
jg013c jg013c is offline
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 168
I had the same thing in my tank a week or two ago. When I asked Dr. Ron about potentially using FWE to kill it he told me that the snail-eating polyclad worm was no more closely related to those little red flatworms than I was. At first I thought Dr. Ron was calling me a flatworm
  #5  
Old 10/21/2005, 11:08 AM
BrianPlankis BrianPlankis is offline
Invertebrate Advocate
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 1,915
Quote:
Originally posted by jg013c
I had the same thing in my tank a week or two ago. When I asked Dr. Ron about potentially using FWE to kill it he told me that the snail-eating polyclad worm was no more closely related to those little red flatworms than I was. At first I thought Dr. Ron was calling me a flatworm
Thanks for the info...flatworm

Brian
__________________
Currently redesigning my 90 gallon tank system to support coral and invertebrate breeding. Click on my red house to see the thread with the progress.
  #6  
Old 10/24/2005, 12:01 PM
rshimek rshimek is offline
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Posts: 24,898
Hi Brian,

Yup, as Mike has pointed out it is a polyclad flatworm.

To clear up some confusion... the old taxonomic grouping called the "Phylum Platyhelminthes" is no longer considered to be a valid group. Examination of the fine structure of the animals in it, coupled with analyses of the genetic material, indicates that it was a "false" grouping, one made on gross structural appearance. Unfortunately, not all things that look alike are related (sorta like sharks, porpoises, and tuna all have the same general shape, but are only very distantly related).

The so-called "red planaria" not only are not planarians, but now are recognized as being members of an entirely separate group, given the name the Acoela or Acoelomorpha. Planarians - and polyclads such as the animal illustrated in the first post of this thread - are in the group that used to be called the "Class Turbellaria" of the Phylum Platyhelminthes. Calling them "Turbellarians" (a group now including actual planarians, polyclads, and several other meaty free-living (mostly) flatworms) is probably the best way to go. I suspect the nomenclature of the group will shake out over the next few years as more work is done on the internal inter-relationships within it.
  #7  
Old 10/24/2005, 02:43 PM
romunov romunov is offline
Worm person
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 4,378
Send a message via ICQ to romunov
Quote:
To clear up some confusion... the old taxonomic grouping called the "Phylum Platyhelminthes" is no longer considered to be a valid group. Examination of the fine structure of the animals in it, coupled with analyses of the genetic material, indicates that it was a "false" grouping, one made on gross structural appearance. Unfortunately, not all things that look alike are related (sorta like sharks, porpoises, and tuna all have the same general shape, but are only very distantly related).
Sooky, that's what we were discussing today at invertebrate zoology class.
__________________
Life is too short to learn everything from experience.
"And ye shall know the Truth and the Truth shall set you free."
 

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Use of this web site is subject to the terms and conditions described in the user agreement.
Reef Central Reef Central, LLC. Copyright 1999-2009