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  #1  
Old 01/06/2008, 09:19 AM
saveafish saveafish is offline
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Making your own morph's ??????

I went to a farmers thing with a friend. Whoo hoo. Over all it was as exciting as watching grass grow. There was a thing that had me thinking. They took different trees and spliced them together to come up with cool tasting fruit. Could this be done to make really cool looking morphs. For a example. a green keyna with a branch cut off and a brown branch sew to it in its place with fishing line till it healed. Or a sps of the same species like a green one with a frag taken away and a red branch glued to its spot.???? just woundering??
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  #2  
Old 01/06/2008, 10:26 AM
Kolognekoral Kolognekoral is offline
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Corals will mix on the joining points, but still remain their individual variety. One cannot crate new morphs, just a mixed lot grown into each other.

Also, while on the subject of grafting trees, the grafts fruit will not be effected by the root stock in flavour! Grafting trees is a process to control the overall growth of a cultivar, or getting multiple cultivars growing from a single root stock. Grafting is used with most commercial fruits and roses as a general means of propogation. Don't let someone tell you they are producing a completely new variety via grafting. That is BS.
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  #3  
Old 01/06/2008, 10:27 AM
greenbean36191 greenbean36191 is offline
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Generally compatibility issues between corals, even of the same species, keep this type of thing from being successful. A few people have had success with Montipora and there are even a few reports of multiple species of Montipora in the wild sharing a single skeleton, though that should be taken with a grain of salt since we can't clearly define what a species actually is with corals.
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  #4  
Old 01/06/2008, 11:36 AM
saveafish saveafish is offline
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well there goes the idea of mixing a hybird so to speak.
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  #5  
Old 01/08/2008, 08:34 PM
2crazyreefers 2crazyreefers is offline
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I have something going on in my 180 sps tank. A Loripes and unknown green/blue acro grew into each other about a month ago and where they are joined is a beautiful solid purple that is now about 1/4 inch and growing. What would someone call this ?
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  #6  
Old 01/09/2008, 12:58 AM
Kolognekoral Kolognekoral is offline
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Sounds fascinating! Have you taken photos? hard to say what may cause this, but I seriously doubt we have a new morph. It the second coral possibly another A. loripes?

In other life forms, where such combinations have appeared, they typically are only temporary chimaeras and revert to one of the original organisms. They are closely related, which makes it possible in the first place.

I had a pair of Acros that had grown together on a stone, but they always showed their distinctive attributes, despite the branch of one sprouting right through the tissue of the other. One eventually became dominant, due to its faster growth rate. I eventually lost the coral, but the skeleton must be around somewhere. I still have a tiny frag of the dominant Acro.
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  #7  
Old 01/09/2008, 08:12 PM
2crazyreefers 2crazyreefers is offline
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I am very sure only one is loripes. It appears the loripes is actualy growing down and around the branch of the other acro and where this is happening it is a really awsome purple color.
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